Home > Communication, Disunity > What is “science” communication?

What is “science” communication?

December 10, 2011 Leave a comment Go to comments

According to Thompson-Reuters, eight-thousand and seventy-three science and engineering journals published just over one million peer-reviewed articles in 2010. Another two-thousand one hundred and seventy-six social science journals published over 200,000 papers. This works out to two peer-reviewed journal articles being published every minute of every hour of every day for the entire year.

At the start of the millennium, there were “only” seven-thousand three-hundred and eighty-three journals. So in a mere ten years, almost three-thousand new journals were formed. This trend will surely intensify as more nations invest in science. Brazil, China, Korea and Turkey are all publishing at least 10% more scientific papers every year. Even tiny countries like Tunisia and Qatar are getting in the game, more than tripling the share of GDP spent on research since 1996 (see here).

So what does it mean to be a scientist anymore? Is it fair to group theoretical physicists with observational ecologists? Should these groups have the same label when scientists in the same discipline don’t always overlap? I have attended several annual meetings of the American Geophysical Union. It always struck me that the soil scientists are separated—physically and intellectually—from the space physicists. The near-Earth space physicists are separated from those studying Mars, who are in turn separated from those studying Venus.

Looking at this motley array, it’s hard not to conclude that there is no “science.” There are only sciences.  It’s also hard not to conclude that “science” communication is a problematic concept. Given how vast, diverse, and balkanized research has become, what exactly are individual scientists communicating? How does any single person have the authority to speak for a $1 trillion dollar, seven million person global enterprise?
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Categories: Communication, Disunity
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